extradimensionalanthropology:

As one of those weirdo’s not in the Harry Potter maelstrom, I am confused.

Has someone explained Death of the Author to this supposedly great writer of our (postmodern) time?

Because I am getting a serious Night of the Living Dead vibe from this. As in maybe (figurative) shotguns should be more involved.

wish fulfillment is publicly recanting your published novel plot years later

And yes I know Dickens tried to do it in Great Expectations, but does anyone remember how that worked out? Badly. It worked out badly and was not taken well.

Cormac McCarthy’s ex-wife arrested for pulling a gun out of her vagina after an argument about aliens goes bad

iheartchaos:

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When Jennifer McCarthy, ex-wife of Pulitzer Prize winning author Cormac McCarthy was laying in bed one Saturday morning with her boyfriend, the two were arguing over the existence of aliens, as happens, when Jennifer stormed out. Upon returning, McCarthy pulled a gun from her vajayjay, the same vajayjay that produced a son for her and Cormac that was the inspiration for The Road, and begin waving the gun around, threatening to shoot her beau.

Read the story here

theatlantic:

The Jewish Mark Twain

Dracula, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe: it takes a special kind of greatness for a literary character to achieve autonomy from his creator. Like those “folk songs” that are actually the products of a single pen (“This Land Is Your Land,” say), such figures come to seem as if they’d sprung directly from the popular imagination, effacing their originators altogether. Everyone has heard of Frankenstein; not many know who Mary Shelley is.
Such is the case with Tevye, the jocular giant of Yiddish literature. With his trio of marriageable daughters and his eternal little town of Anatevka, his largeness and simplicity, he seems to come to us directly from the pages of a folktale. You’d almost have to be a Yiddishist to recognize the name of his creator, Sholem Aleichem. Yet once he was a giant, too: the voice of Eastern European Jewry by universal acclamation; the creator, Jeremy Dauber tells us in his new biography, of modern Jewish literature as well as modern Jewish humor; the man to whom the author of Huckleberry Finn replied, upon being introduced to “the Jewish Mark Twain,” “please tell him that I am the American Sholem Aleichem.” His death in 1916 was the occasion of the largest public funeral New York had ever witnessed.
Read more. [Image: Yivo Institute]


People don’t know who Sholem Aleichem is?What parallel world do I live in? Oh right? Jewish land.

theatlantic:

The Jewish Mark Twain

Dracula, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe: it takes a special kind of greatness for a literary character to achieve autonomy from his creator. Like those “folk songs” that are actually the products of a single pen (“This Land Is Your Land,” say), such figures come to seem as if they’d sprung directly from the popular imagination, effacing their originators altogether. Everyone has heard of Frankenstein; not many know who Mary Shelley is.

Such is the case with Tevye, the jocular giant of Yiddish literature. With his trio of marriageable daughters and his eternal little town of Anatevka, his largeness and simplicity, he seems to come to us directly from the pages of a folktale. You’d almost have to be a Yiddishist to recognize the name of his creator, Sholem Aleichem. Yet once he was a giant, too: the voice of Eastern European Jewry by universal acclamation; the creator, Jeremy Dauber tells us in his new biography, of modern Jewish literature as well as modern Jewish humor; the man to whom the author of Huckleberry Finn replied, upon being introduced to “the Jewish Mark Twain,” “please tell him that I am the American Sholem Aleichem.” His death in 1916 was the occasion of the largest public funeral New York had ever witnessed.

Read more. [Image: Yivo Institute]

People don’t know who Sholem Aleichem is?

What parallel world do I live in? Oh right? Jewish land.

It’s hard for me to even remember the last time I was in a library.

[I]t’s impossible to see a world where we keep libraries open simply to pretend they still serve a purpose for which they no longer serve.
What Did Poe Know About Cosmology? Nothing. But He Was Right.

iheartchaos:

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In 1848, by then a nationally celebrated poet, Edgar Allan Poe published ”Eureka,” a 150-page prose poem on the nature and origin of the universe. The work, an overheated grab bag of metaphysics and cosmology, was a flop. A reviewer for Literary World likened it to ”arrant fudge.” A hundred years later T. S. Eliot summed up the critical consensus. ”Eureka,” he wrote, ”makes no deep impression … because we are aware of Poe’s lack of qualification in philosophy, theology or natural science.”

Read More

(Source: sagansense)

Check out some of Guillermo Del Toro’s sketches for At the Mountain of Madness

iheartchaos:

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If you were saddened and disappointed that Guillermo Del Toro had to cancel his plans to turn HP Lovecraft’s ‘At the Mountains of Madness’ into a movie, you’ll probably be sadder to look at some of Del Toro’s sketches for the film. 

Read More

iheartchaos:

Jane Austen will be appearing on Britain’s £10 note

Austen will only be the third woman to appear on British currency, and here in the US, all we get mainly are stuffy old statesmen. We should include American authors on our money… people like Edgar Allen Poe and HP Lovecraft and Robert Heinlein.

Via

Man searching for ‘the meaning of life’ steals upwards of 800 books from a single store

Jul 16, 2013 by Philip Kendal

A young man from Nanjing, China, has been arrested after stealing more than 800 social science textbooks, history compendiums and poetry books from a book shop in the town. When questioned by police, the young man maintained that he was searching for ‘the meaning of life’ within the books’ pages.

Noticing that an unusually large amount of highbrow reading material was going unaccounted for, the owner of the book shop contacted the local authorities, wherein plain-clothes officers were sent to keep an eye out for the thief or thieves. Midway through their investigation, officers spotted a young man who would always arrive at the book shop on an electric bicycle that had ample storage space. Whenever he left the store, the same young man always appeared to be carrying several brand-new books, which he quickly stowed in his bike before riding off.

Having repeatedly observed the young man’s suspicious behaviour, police contacted the store owner again and asked that they run a stock take. Sure enough, some 30 more books had vanished. Confident that they had their man, police moved to catch the thief red-handed.

Upon his arrest, the young man, who is known simply as ‘Mr. Lee’, admitted that he had been swiping books from the store since February this year, and had amassed a collection of more than 800 titles in less than six months, hitting the same shop three or four times a week. After reading the books, he would sell them on, using whatever money he made for day-to-day expenses.

Somewhat tragically, the man claimed to have taken the books in an effort to find some form of meaning in his existence, but, having devoured more literature than most full-time college students would during their entire time in tertiary education, he was still none the wiser as to why we are here.

“I couldn’t comprehend the meaning of life,” the thief confessed. “I was hoping to find the answer by reading those books.”

We’re not sure whether to laugh or cry right now…

Source: NariNari (Japanese)

iheartchaos:

This is the real Iron Throne George R. R. Martin envisioned while writing Game of Thrones. It’s pretty terrifying.

Read more here

iheartchaos:

This is the real Iron Throne George R. R. Martin envisioned while writing Game of Thrones. It’s pretty terrifying.

Read more here

(Source: digg)

Politician introduces legislation to make sci-fi a mandatory public school reading

iheartchaos:

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Politicians are mostly full of shit, and often in West Virginia doubly so, but one politicians in West Virginia has put forth legislation to make science fiction mandatory public school reading. Ryan Canterbury, you are a hero.

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bookshelfporn:

Neil Gaiman’s Personal Library (The Basement, Neil Gaiman’s Home)

mayorofawesometown:

Behind The Closed Eyelids by Chatalaw

mayorofawesometown:

Behind The Closed Eyelids by Chatalaw

thatlibrary:

Klementium Library, Prague, Czech Republic

thatlibrary:

Klementium Library, Prague, Czech Republic